Motorcyclists Statistics
(Singapore 2020)

A comprehensive guide to motorcyclists statistics in Singapore.

Last Updated: September, 2020.

Highlights

Motorcyclists in Singapore may have some cause to feel aggrieved: Obtaining a motorcycle license is a longer and more difficult process than for a car car licence; classic motorcycle enthusiasts have seen their motorcycles banned for pollution concerns;[1] and recent changes to taxation has seen price increases, particularly for larger-capacity motorcycles.[2]

Still, despite potential roadblocks, the number Singaporeans obtaining motorcycle licenses has increased in recent years.

Getting a licence

Aspiring motorcyclists in Singapore must undertake a number of theory and practical training and tests[3] before obtaining a Class 2B license that allows them to ride 200cc or lower capacity motorcycles. This process is likely to take three months or more, involving numerous theory and practical lessons, tests and a Traffic Police practical test.

After one year with a 2B license, riders over 19 who have not accumulated more than 12 demerit points under the Driver Improvement Point System (DIPS), can enroll to obtain a class 2A license, for 201cc-400cc motorcycles, which involves theory and practical lessons, as well as passing a Traffic Police test.

After one year with a Class 2A license, riders over 20 who have not accumulated more than 12 demerit points under DIPS, can enroll to obtain a Class 2 license for motorcycles exceeding 400cc, which involves practical lessons and passing a Traffic Police test.

At the end of 2018 there were 515,691 Class 2B license holders, 196,544 Class 2A license holders, and 132,390 Class 2 license holders in Singapore. This represents an increase of 31 percent, 4.9 percent, and a decrease of 0.02 percent over 10 years, respectively. [4]

Unsurprisingly, with more Class 2B licenses than any other, sales of class 2B motorcycles are the highest.

Singapore’s Motorcycle Fleet

Despite the increase in number of license holders, the number of Class 2B motorcycles on Singapore roads declined 14% between 2007 and 2017. The number of Class 2A motorcycles increased 8% in that time, the number of Class 2 machines increased 115%, and the overall motorcycle fleet declined 1.5%.

That increase may seem counterintuitive, but possibly reflects the enthusiasm of those motorcyclists who have invested significant time and money upgrading their licenses.

Motorcycle population by licence class:

Licence class

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2B (200cc & below)

111,082

111,540

112,123

112,515

110,188

107,030

106,480

103,933

100,418

97,924

95,170

2A (201-400cc)

21,566

21,971

21,622

21,415

21,154

20,807

20,966

21,827

22,574

22,830

23,267

2 (over 401cc)

10,834

11,777

12,592

13,352

14,338

15,449

16,861

18,644

20,287

21,685

22,867

Total

143,482

145,288

146,337

147,282

145,680

143,286

144,307

144,404

143,279

142,439

141,304

Source:  https://data.gov.sg/dataset/annual-motorcycle-population-by-cc-rating

Certificate of Entitlement

Motorcycles, like cars, are subject to Singapore’s Certificate of Entitlement (COE) system, which manages the overall number of vehicles on the roads.

While the chart above shows a four percent decline in the overall number of motorcycles on the roads between 2009 and 2019, this is less reflective of demand than of regulation.

With limits on supply, demand is reflected in COE Quota Premiums, which have increased from $1,253 in April 2010 for Category D (Motorcycles) to $4,310 in March 2020. [5]

These higher Quota Premiums also go some way to explaining the increase in number of larger capacity motorcycles: The percentage of the purchase price reflected by the Quota Premium is lower for larger, more expensive motorcycles, than for cheaper ones.

Top 10 Motorcycles brands by new registrations

Yamaha and Honda – motorcycle manufacturers that offer a full range of motorcycles across different license classes – dominate sales, representing 39% and 32% of total sales respectively in 2017.

Source: https://data.gov.sg/dataset/annual-new-registration-of-motorcycles-by-make

Top 10 Brands by Vehicle Population, 2017

Unsurprisingly, the brands that sell the most also tend to represent the largest fleets on the roads.

Source: https://data.gov.sg/dataset/annual-motorcycle-population-by-make

Age distribution

Given the incentives to scrap older vehicles under the 10-year COE scheme, it would make sense that the percentage of motorcycles drops off at that 10-year COE-renewal limit. That the drops in car population – particularly for cars over 15 years – are much sharper is possibly explained by the vastly higher cost of Category A and Category B car COEs. Data is from 2017

Source: https://data.gov.sg/dataset/annual-age-distribution-of-motorcycles

Average distance travelled

Motorcyclists average lower annual kilometers travelled than other forms of transport.

In 2018 the average motorcycle was ridden 13,000km, compared to 17,500km for private cars. Motorcycle usage has remained flat, with the average distance travelled in 2008 being 13,300km, while distance travelled by private car has fallen from 19,700km. [6]

Safety

Singapore injuries and fatalities

While the number of fatalities and injuries has fallen in recent years, motorcyclists and pillion riders are overrepresented compared to car drivers.

Number of fatalities

In 2017, 44 motorcyclists and pillions were killed in road accidents in 2017, down from 108 in 2008. In the same time car driver and passenger fatalities have fallen from 23 to 9.

While the trend is in the right direction, obviously any fatalities are unwanted. The number of injuries incurred by motorcycle riders and pillions has fallen from 5,218 in 2008 to 4,803 in 2017. In the same time injuries sustained by car drivers and passengers has fallen from 2,562 to 2,485.

‘Failing to keep a proper lookout’ was the main cause of all injury and fatality accidents in 2017, causing 2,097 of 4,633 such accidents. [7]

Ride safe

Follow basic safety procedures and be aware on the roads.

Safety Technology

Arguably the biggest technological advance in motorcycle safety in recent years has been the wider adoption of antilock braking systems (ABS) on motorcycles. Data compiled in the US by the Highway Loss Data Institute shows “After controlling for auto claim frequency, motorcycles equipped with optional ABS were associated with a 21 percent reduction in claim frequency compared with similar motorcycles without ABS.” Other studies have estimated ABS has the potential to prevent 38 to 50 percent of motorcycle crashes. [8]

Citations:

[1] https://www.nea.gov.sg/programmes-grants/grants-and-awards/incentive-to-de-register-older-motorcycles

[2] https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/singapore-budget-2017-motorcycles-to-get-three-tiered-additional-registration

[3] https://www.cdc.com.sg/course/class-2b

[4] https://data.gov.sg/dataset/driving-licence-information-qualified-driving-licence-holders?resource_id=2c9d02bb-d9c3-4659-a86c-ce6d94a208bd

[5] https://data.gov.sg/dataset/coe-bidding-results

[6] https://data.gov.sg/dataset/annual-mileage-for-private-motor-vehicles

[7] https://www.police.gov.sg/~/media/b42385dfcf4a4257894e6468211110be.ashx

[8] https://www-esv.nhtsa.dot.gov/Proceedings/24/files/24ESV-000256.PDF

Disclaimer:

Data on this website was sourced in September 2020 with the latest available data from September 2020. Auto & General Insurance (Singapore) Pte. Limited does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the data and accepts no liability whatsoever arising from or connected in any way to the use or reliance upon this data.